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Holi Festival Australia

Top Seven Movies to Watch this month

 Top Seven Movies to Watch this month

A get-together with friends or having a girl’s or boy’s day out are common ways to distress and enjoy some quality time. On the other hand, some people prefer to stay home and just have the day to themselves; ordering pizza or fixing some snacks and laying on the couch might sound ideal. The only other thing that enhances the “at-home relaxation experience” is a good movie or a series.

Therefore, we bring you a list of movies that is worth your time; you can find them on streaming services, or you can rent them online.

Piggy

Piggy

Piggy is a revenge drama with a twist that explores topics such as body shaming, bullying, dysmorphia and the psychological impact of it all. With its rosy, sun-drenched colour palette (at least initially), Carlota Pereda’s spiky Spanish horror understands girlish anxiety so well that it could comfortably be a coming-of-age pic.

Behind the glass counter of her parents’ butcher shop, Sara (Laura Galán) keeps a safe distance from the cool-girl clique, which mercilessly makes fun of her weight. Highly aware of her body, Sara’s self-consciousness is exacerbated by an overly protective mother, who watches her every move. As if growing pains aren’t bad enough, Richard Holmes’s burly, oddly charismatic serial killer wanders into the small Spanish town and starts abducting her bullies.

The Woman King

The Woman King

In The Woman King, Davis stars as Nanisca, the militant leader of the Agojie, an all-female army protecting the West African kingdom of Dahomey with the ferocity of Greek Spartans. Covered in scars and haunted by the past, Nanisca commands her troops with a singular focus.

Threats come at them from every angle – the violent Oyo Empire wants to overrun them at home, and the Europeans want to control them from afar. But the Agojie only begin to crack when their king (John Boyega) begins to compromise, and a young woman (Thuso Mbedu) emerges to challenge the norm.

Davis’ interpretation of Nanisca is calculating and cutthroat, much like her roles in Widows, Fences, and even the Suicide Squad movies and the Peacemaker TV series, as the ride-or-die Amanda Waller. But Nanisca draws power from her emotional core – she’s always human, even when she’s larger than life. Though Davis, a producer on The Woman King as well as its lead, recruited Prince-Bythewood to helm the film after directing Netflix’s grounded superhero movie The Old Guard, the filmmaker ultimately demanded more from her star than just a calibrated historical performance: Davis and her costars needed to move like fighters, too.

Sharper

Sharper

Sharper is out on Apple TV+. The 116-minute film marks the feature debut of television veteran Benjamin Caron. The screenplay, by Brian Gatewood and Alessandro Tanaka, has one enduring idea: emotional attachment is the most significant and oldest con game around.

The romance between Tom (Justice Smith), the owner of a store that sells rare books, and literature student Sandra (Briana Middleton) is aptly described by one of Tom’s friends: she’s like a dream.

From Tom, we move backwards and sideways in time to the other key characters: Max (Sebastian Stan), Madeline (Julianne Moore), and Richard (John Lithgow). As the connections between them become apparent, the film allows us to savour the performances of Julianne Moore, whose sweetness sheathes ruthlessness, and Sebastian Stan, as dead-eyed as he is cold-hearted.

Residue

Residue

Residue is a fleeting and haunting lament for what is lost to gentrification and other tolls on black life in America. But at the same, it’s exhilarating and monumental, laced with the sensation that we’re discovering a bold and sensitive new voice.

Writer and director Merawi Gerima’s debut, released by Ava DuVernay’s independent film collective Array, tells a prodigal son story about a man returning to his old stomping grounds. And in that story, Gerima experiments with performance and vérité, intimate narrative and poetic abstractions. His artistry is thoughtful. But more than anything, it’s emotional.

Residue’s grave terms are spoken early on. A disembodied voiceover asks whether Jay’s camera is a weapon trying to save the community or whether the filmmaker is actually an archaeologist coming to unearth bones from the concrete. As if resigned to the inevitable, the film documents black culture in the city as if it needs to be fossilised on camera. The opening is a rush of images and sounds from a DC block party. The black community dances on the street while local rap group CCB’s Roll Call bumps on the soundtrack. Then comes the police and white residents walking their dogs. That prologue sums things up.

Emily, the Criminal

Emily, the Criminal

Aubrey Plaza becomes a thief” – conjures up a bone-dry comedy in which her deadpan persona creates ironic friction with the criminal underworld. But “Emily the Criminal” isn’t that movie at all; it’s a “chilly, assured thriller,” a Michael Mann-ish procedural with nary a wink in sight, and it absolutely (albeit surprisingly) works.

The writer and director John Patton Ford create moments of real tension while also giving what feels like an insider’s view of this world of thieves and hustlers. And if Plaza’s turn as a deep-in-debt temp worker trying her hand at life on the margins sounds like novelty casting, think again — she’s spectacular. (For more indie drama, try “Leave No Trace” or “We the Animals.”

The Sting

The Sting

Few onscreen pairings have conveyed affection and camaraderie as effortlessly as that of Paul Newman and Robert Redford, and they easily recaptured the magic of “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” in their second onscreen collaboration (again under the guidance of “Cassidy” director George Roy Hill).

Set in the 1930s, this sparkling, comedic con caper finds our handsome heroes mounting a giant operation to swindle a corrupt banker (Robert Shaw), all to the ragtime sounds of Scott Joplin’s piano. There are turns and reversals aplenty, along with the endless charm. (For more buddy comedy, stream “The Nice Guys” and “21 Jump Street.”)

Disturbia

Disturbia

2007’s Disturbia was a modern reimagining of the Alfred Hitchcock classic Rear Window. The idea of remaking one of Hitchcock’s best movies may not sound like a good one on paper, but director D. J. Caruso did an admirable job with Disturbia. It was mostly well-received by critics and a huge box office success.

Shia LaBeouf was terrific as Kale Brecht, a troubled 17-year-old placed under house arrest for assault. To cope with the boredom, he begins to spy on his neighbour, the mysterious Robert Turner (David Morse) and starts to suspect he may be a serial killer. With the help of his friend Ronnie (Aaron Yoo) and love interest Ashley (Sarah Roemer), Kale sets out to prove Robert’s guilt.

Saad Kapoor

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